What is Celtic Christianity?

wild-goose-holy-spirit

Bird from the Book of Kells. This looks like it could be a goose. The wild goose was the Celtic Christian symbol for the Holy Spirit.

Question: “What is Celtic Christianity?”

Answer: Celtic Christianity is a modern movement wherein ancient practices that were presumed to be followed in Christianity in the British Isles are integrated into current Christian practice. The community of practitioners is usually centralized within an abbey, although individuals may worship at churches of different denominations (always Protestant; usually liturgical). The claim is that Celtic Christianity teaches the traditions of the early Christians in the British Isles before Roman Catholicism gained ground there.

The Celts were a loose association of tribes that emerged in Eastern Europe and over the years covered territory from modern-day Turkey to the Atlantic Ocean. They were also known as the Gauls by the Romans. It’s thought the Celts founded the city of Galatia. By the time of Christ, the Romans had pushed the Celtic tribes to the British Isles with a few small settlements remaining in France and Spain.

An unconfirmed, extra-biblical legend says that Joseph of Arimathea was a relative of Mary’s and took the young Jesus to the British Isles, where Joseph managed the Roman tin mines. After Jesus’ ascension, Joseph is said to have traveled back to Britain and introduced Christianity to the locals. Instead of adopting a Jewish or Greek Christianity, the converted Druids worshiped Christ through the lens of their own culture. They emphasized family and tribe, the monastic life of the North African Christians, and a connection to God through nature. Women held more authority than in Europe and Asia, church leaders reveled in spiritual study, and theology was centered on the Trinity. Sacred places where pagans had once interacted with evil spirits became sanctuaries where people could commune with the Holy Spirit (whom they pictured as Ah Geadh-Glas, or the “Wild Goose,” rather than the Heavenly Dove). [ More here  ]


Source Got Questions -Celtic-Christianity
Image Attributed to B Mc Mahan B Mc Mahan, (NA), Bird of the Book of Kells [ONLINE]. Available at: <….https://i.pinimg.com/originals/52/e8/99/52e89911fb3abceb083c588594652653.jpg…&gt;. [Accessed 10 May 2018].
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